• Fede Montagud, editor

    Perspiration is essential

    1 Apr Perspiration is essential

     

    Sources:

    EFE Salud

    Our skin regulates body temperature by sweating. Although we are not aware of it, this sophisticated natural mechanism keeps us alive, because the body requires a constant internal temperature. But some people do not sweat enough, and, in some cases, this disorder has serious repercussions.

     

    This blog has already included a post on the bothersome problem of excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) and its treatments. But sweating too little (hypohidrosis) or not sweating at all (anhidrosis) are much more dangerous to health, because the body fails to maintain its proper temperature. The pores of the skin, usually easily seen under a magnifying glass, are virtually invisible in people with these problems. The causes, whether genetic, endocrinological (diabetes, hypothyroidism) or neurological, affect the nerves involved in sweating. Symptoms include dizziness, headache, nausea, trembling, fever and tachycardia. These syndromes have no cure or medication, but fortunately affect few people. The only solution is to hydrate properly and avoid heat stroke by staying in the shade.

  • Núria Estapé, science journalist

    Enzymes for skin care

    21 Mar Enzymes for skin care

     

    Sources:

    The New York Times

    Enzymology is a new research area in dermatology and cosmetics that tries to discover how enzymes can improve skin appearance and prevent skin problems. Pharmaceutical companies study enzymes associated with skin disorders, whereas the cosmetics sector is interested in enzymes that enhance the beauty of the skin. However, including suitable enzymes in the diet is currently the most natural and effective way to achieve a healthy and beautiful skin.

     

    To remain healthy and vibrant the skin needs to be nourished with fats, proteins and carbohydrates. For these substances to act optimally on skin tissues, they need certain small molecules, called enzymes, to accelerate chemical reactions. Enzymes help food pass from the blood to the skin, develop beneficial fats and repair collagen damaged by ultraviolet rays, just to name a few of their many functions. There are many kinds of enzymes. Those most frequently used in cosmetics, called proteolytic enzymes, break down proteins so that the skin can better absorb their components and so promote cell growth and renewal. Read More

  • Fede Montagud, editor

    Fatal attraction: is it chemistry?

    16 Mar Fatal attraction: is it chemistry?

     

    Sources:

    Medciencia

    "We met and immediately there was ‘chemistry’ between us, bubbling just below the surface of our skin ...”. This is the typical explanation for a sudden attraction between two people. If we are lucky we have had the experience. Is it possible that our skin or chemistry can lead us straight to passion? Let’s see if there is any scientific explanation for love at first sight ...

     

    We take it for granted that humans are more rational and sophisticated than other beings, thanks to the rapid development of the human brain. Whereas animals, less advanced, relate exclusively according to basic primary and irrational mechanisms. This is not entirely true, however, as we unconsciously react to many chemical stimuli secreted by others. The pheromones we emit (but which we do not smell) trigger responses in others. For example, androsterone, a male pheromone secreted primarily through the skin, is perceived (unconsciously) by females and can trigger an immediate physical response. Read More

  • Anna Solana, science journalist

    Menopause: maturity is skin deep

    11 Feb Menopause: maturity is skin deep

     

    Sources:

    Virtualmedicalcentre

    The menopause receives bad press. Many women associate it with a loss of attractiveness, because it marks the end of a life stage and is the source of discomfort and changes. Less well known, perhaps, are how it causes changes in the skin that do not affect all women equally, but largely depend on skin type and lifestyle. But – is there a solution?

     

    Menopause marks the end of the reproductive stage and involves significant changes for women. But there are ways to cope. According to the Spanish Association for Menopause Studies (AEEM), menopause occurs at 51.4 years on average, once the body stops producing oestrogen and progesterone; it ends ovarian functioning and, therefore, the menstrual period. Hormonal changes are to blame for hot flushes, insomnia, mood swings and vaginal atrophy, and also ageing of the skin, in other words, dryness, wrinkles and sagging. Read More

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